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I'm a Sagittarius, learning to spin poi, tattooed, pierced, left handed, live in southern california, love photography, fashion, make-up, fire, anime. There's more, but enough about me..

deathpoolquinn:

thatsmoderatelyraven:

wakaflackalypse:

my house

i would have this house and then the inside would be freakin colorful and awesome on the inside and no one would ever know

are you Tim Burton?

deathpoolquinn:

thatsmoderatelyraven:

wakaflackalypse:

my house

i would have this house and then the inside would be freakin colorful and awesome on the inside and no one would ever know

are you Tim Burton?

ironboobs:

"Oh captain, my captain."

scarfprincess:

unwoundghost:

mylovewillflow:

oh my god this is beautiful

The artist has a few other really lovely comics! I’ve added a source so you can see them.

[source]

last-on-your-lips:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, Follow Ultrafacts

THE LAST ONE

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

flourishnblottts:

myresin:

hawkules:

imagine a video game where you create a hero whose destiny is to save everyone, but throughout the game you start making harder and more questionable decisions, and the game gets darker and darker. and in the end you’re just standing there, clutching the controller and finally realizing you were playing the villain all along

I WANT THIS GAME!

OMG!

image

WHY HAVENT THEY MADE THIS YET

dek-says-so:

lkdsjfalsdkfjaldskjfladskjfaldskfjalkdsjf

booboobearbrook93:

Hot day, time to break out the dresses. #maxidress #rockabilly #fatbabe #effyourbeautystandards  #me

booboobearbrook93:

Hot day, time to break out the dresses. #maxidress #rockabilly #fatbabe #effyourbeautystandards #me

earthmoss:

Phallus Indusiatus mushroom 

earthmoss:

Phallus Indusiatus mushroom 

asylum-art:

These are fascinating sculptures done by Robert Cannon . He calls the work Terraform Sculpture. TERRAFORM (literally, “Earth-shaping”) the process of deliberate modification of the atmosphere, temperature, surface topography or ecology to be similar to those of Earth to make it habitable by humans. While in Robert’s case, he uses concrete and mosses with most of his creations.


Alla Osipenko with John Markovsky, ca. 1970s

Alla Osipenko with John Markovsky, ca. 1970s

unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream:

Japanese artist Sebastian Masuda’s installation Colorful Rebellion — Seventh Nightmare feels like stumbling into a wonderland that is simultaneously vividly bright, candy-sweet, and disorienting. This installation, which filled the Kianga Ellis Projects in Chelsea, New York earlier this year, features a room bursting with manufactured objects of cuteness, including bundles of fake fur, stuffed animals, plastic jewelry, girl’s hair accessories, dollhouses, and other colorful toys that completely cover the walls and ceiling of the room. In the middle of the room is a bed, which visitors could lay upon and gaze up at the explosion of “Harajuku kawaii” closing in on them from every direction.

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